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Full text of "Dirego (1964)"

1964 





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DIREGO 




1964 




DEDICATION 

IN MEMORIAM 

FACULTY 

TRAINING SCHOOL 

SENIORS 

UNDERCLASSMEN 

ORGANIZATIONS 

SPORTS 

CLASS HISTORY 

CANDIDS 

SENIOR ACTIVITIES 




CONTENTS 










FOREWORD 



He that governs leads the blind, but he that 
teaches gives them eyes. 



We inherited our positions as students 
in this college community from those who 
came before. We have dug our roots 
deeply into its soil as young saplings and 
were nourished and grew to the stateliness 
of seniors. Those things which we 
have begun will yet remain for others 
to continue. Our predecessors and profes- 
sors pointed the way for us and now as 
we pass through the portals of this college 
into the world; it will be ours to say, 
"Dirego" I point the way, and translate 
it in our unique ways. 





DEDICATION 



JOHN T. McNULTY 



A Senior bids farewell 



These things I wish for you for our friendships' sake 

A sunburnt thatch, a door to [ace the sun 

At westering, the noise of homing rooks; 

A kind, old lazy chair, a courtly cat 

To rub against your knees; 

Shelves of well chosen books; 



I wish you friends whose wisdom makes than kind, 

Well-leisured friends to share your evening's peace, 

Friends who can season knowledge with a laugh; 

A hedge of lavender, a patch of thyme, 

With sage and marjoram and rosemary, 

A damask rosebush and a hive of bees, 

And callages that hold tin 1 morning's dew, 

A black bird in the orchard boughs - all these, 

And God bless you. 

Anonymous 

WOO Years of Irish Poetry 



We find it fitting to dedicate this page to the memory of John Fitzgerald 
Kennedy, not only bcacuse of the magnanimous position which he occupied in 
our world, but because of the lesson we have learned through his passing — 
the necessity of brotherhood and peace. Much has been revealed to us during our 
college life, but this, significant of our senior year, we did not learn from books; 
but rather, from an unjust act. What greater tribute can we now pay to this man 
and to this world but to carry on his spirit of universal brotherhood and peace. 
In this way only, can justice of any sort be rendered. 



IN MEMORIAM 




JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY 

1917-1963 




To the Class of 1964: 

Another year has slipped away and another 
class has completed the four years of college. 

You are now ready for your life's work as 
teachers of the youth of our country. You begin 
at a time of great need. All schools are filled to 
capacity and thousands more must be built as soon 
as possible. Our dynamic world also demands 
changes in the methods and programs of educating 
pupils from their initial school experiences to 
adulthood. You will not only be a part of this but 
I hope you will be among the leaders in the field. 

I ask God to help you to meet this challenge. 



Sincerely, 




'"+%&**& 



President 




PRESIDENT AND MRS. EUGENE L. FREEL 







^-^eOLLEGE COMMUNITY 



■ ■ ■-' ■ I 



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HHHhI! 



FACULTY 





ART DEPARTMENT 




HhTIKj i 



Art is man added to nature. 

Dean of Men: Art Appreciation; Arts and Crafts; Ceramics; 

Exploring Art; History of Art; Modern Art. 



DEAN ANDREW S. FLAGG 

Sc.B. in Ed. M.S. in Ed. E.-D.-M. 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



/ could never divide myself from any man upon the 
difference of opinion, or be angry with this judgement. 




MR. GEORGE H. JARCK 

Sc.B. in Ed. A.M. 

Introduction to Guidance; Occupational In- 
formation; Educational Psychology; History 
and Philosophy of Education; Secondary Social 
Studies Methods. 




12 




Knowledge is of Two kinds we know a .substance 

ourselves or we know whew we can get information upon 
it. 

Academic Dean; Director of Admissions; Methods of Secondary 
Social Studies Teaching. 




MISS MARGARET M. LANOE 

Sc.B. in Ed. M.B.S. 

Children's literature; Elementary School Cur- 
riculum and Method; Guidance in Reading; 
Methods of Secondary English Teaching; 
Remedial Reading. 



DR. JOHN J. KOMOREK 



A.B. A.M. Ed.D. 




As to the adjective; wlu n in doubt, strike it out. 




13 




/ am a gatherer and a disposer of other men's stuff. 

Director of Training and Placement; Methods and Materials in 
Secondary Education. 




DR. RICHARD A. SLEEMAN 

B.S. A.M. Ed.D. 



MR. FREDRICK K. BRESSETTE ENG LISH DEPARTMENT 



Sc.B. in Ed. A.M. 

Speech I and II; Short Story; Modern Drama; 

Play Production; Director of Student-Faculty 

productions. 




"The world's a stage;' as Shakespeare said one day; 
The stage is a world is ichat he meant to say. 




14 





Everything that can be thought at all can be thought 
clearly, everything that can be written can be written 
clearly. 

English Composition; Introduction to English Linguistics; Con- 
temporary Literature; Advanced Composition. 



MR. THOMAS F. DUFFY 

A.B. A.M. 



MISS MARGARET M. TOOLE 

A.B. A.M. 

English Composition; English Literature; The 
Epic: Appreciation of Shakespeare; 18th Cen- 
tury Literature; Humanities Classics; Irish 
Literature. 



A classic is something everybody wants to have read but 
nobody wants to read. 





15 





Books are a finer world within tlic world. 



MR. ROBERT WHEELER 

A.B., A.M. 

English Literature 20 and 21; American Lit- 
erature from 1607-1870 f American Literature 
from 1870-1914. 



GEOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT 



MR. ROBERT BARDEN 

B.S., A.M. 

Geography of Anglo America; Modern Asian 
Geography: European Geography; Economics; 
Economic History of the United States; Cli- 
matology; Statistics. 



Happy is the man who has broken the chains which hurt 
the mind, and has given up worrying once and for all. 





16 




Geography is to history as anatomy is to physiology; it 
describes the theater of events. 

Geology; Physical Geography; Regional Geography; Advanced 
American Government; History of Modern Asia; Geography of 
Latin America, Geography of Europe. 




MR. H. LEE COMBS, JR. 

A.B., A.M. 



MR. EDMUND K. LUDDY 

A.B., A.M. 

American History and Government; History 
of the Americas to 1825; History of Latin 
America; Political Science Classics. 



HISTORY DEPARTMENT 




A historian is exact, sincere, and impartial; free from 
passion, unbiased by interest, fear, resentment or affection; 
and faithful to the truth. 




17 




Have a purpose in lift, and having it, throw yourself 
into your work with such strength of mind and muscle as 
God has given you. 

History of Western Civilization 1 and 1 1 ; The Renaissance and 
Reformation: The Rise of Soviet Russia; Sociology. 




DR. COOPER MILNER 

B.S. in Ed. A.B., Ph.D. 

American History and Government ; Econom- 
ics: Advanced American Government; History 
of Recent American Foreign. 



MR. JOHN T. McNULTY 



A.B., A.M. 




There is nothing so minute, or inconsiderable, that I 
would not rather know it than not. 




18 





History supplies a list of those who hart accomodated 
themselves with the property of otht rs. 



MR. AMES S. PIERCE 

A.B., A.M. 

History of Western Civilization 1 and 11; His- 
tory of the Americas to 1825; Modern Euro- 
pean History; History of Modern Asia; Eco- 
nomics. 



COLLEGE LIBRARY 



College Librarian. 



MRS. SUZANNE KEMPER 

B.F.A., Mc.S. 

The world as I know it from my books is full of abom- 
inable evil; ( ven some of these have never been returned. 






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MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT 



MR. ALI ALMAKER 

B.Sc, E.E., Ed.M. 

Analytic Geometry; Introductory Calculus; 
Differential Calculus: Advanced Calculus; 
Statistics; Differential Equations. 




Humor is the contemplation of the finite from the point 
of view of the infinite. 



MR. GEORGE GLOSTER 

A.B., A.M. 



College Algebra 1 and 11: Physics; General Mathematics: Analytic 
Geometry. 

It require a very unusual mind to undertake an 
analysis of the obvious. 





1 .^^^—^^M*** 1 9T^ * T^^^P 1 * 


— 

* 

1 



The mastery of Mathematics is like thinking with a 
strange head instead of ones own. 




MRS. IRIS O. LILLY 

Sc.B. in Ed., Ed.M. 

General Mathematics: College Algebra 1 and 
11: Introductory Calculus: History of Mathe- 
matics. 



MR. RICHARD FLECK 

A.B., A.M. 

English Composition 1 and 1 1 ; Elementary 
French 10 and 12. 



MODERN LANGUAGE 
DEPARTMENT 




The delectable form which intelligence taki s in its mo- 
ments of surplus power — the form of wit. 




21 




It's a funny thing about life; if you refuse to accept any- 
thing but the best, you very often get it. 




i 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT 



MR. LOUIS S. CUCCINELLO 

B.S.. A.M. 

Music Appreciation; Elementary Theory and 
Harmony; Development of Music to 1600; 
Music in America; Development of Music 
From Baroque to the Present ; Orientation to 
Teaching. 



MRS. ELLEN SCHIFF 

A.B., A.M. 

Elementary French 10 and 11; Intermediate 
French 12 and 13. Masterpieces of French 
Literature. 




The best thing about a popular song is that it is not 
Popular very long. 





PHILOSOPHY AND 
PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENTS 




DR. WILLIAM ANDERSON 

A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Adolescent Psychology; Educational Psy- 
chology; Psychology of Personality; Tests and 
measurements; Child Psychology. 



To know how to suggest is the art of teaching. 



DR. ROBERT V. HAMILTON 

A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 



General Phychology; Adolescent Phychology; Practium in Test- 
ing and Counseling; History and Philosophy of Education; Intro- 
duction to Philosophy; Logic. 

The object of studying Philosophy is to know one's own 
mind, not other peoples. 





23 




PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
DEPARTMENT 




Health is the vital principle of bliss; arid exercise of 
health. 



MRS. PATRICIA PREVEY 

Sc.B. in Ed., Phy. Ed.M. 

Women's Physical Education Instructor; Dean 

of Women. 



MR. JOSEPH ZAVATTARO 



Men's Physical Education Instructor. 

Gymnastics is as good for the body, as thought is for the 
soul; and just as necessary. 




Sc.B. in Ed., Ed.M. 




24 



SCIENCE DEPARTMENTS 




I respect faith, but doubt is what gives one an education. 




DR. JOHN M. C. HESS 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Freshman Chemistry; Organic Chemistry; 
Statistics; Science Seminar; Quantitative anal- 
ysis; Qualitative analysis. 



MR. KENNETH O. DAVIS 

A.B., A.M. 

Science Seminar; Methods cf Secondary 
Science and Mathematics Teaching; General 
Chemistry'; Organic Chemistry; Quantitative 
analysis; Qualitative analysis. 




\ 




We give advice, but we cannot give the wisdom to profit 
by it. 




25 




Heredity is nothing but stored environment. 




MR. GARY RESNICK 

B.S., M.S. 

General Biology; General Botany; Genetics; 
Ecology; Micro Biology; Zoology. 



DR. NATHAN LAVENDA 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

General Biology; General Botany; Zoology; 
Physiology; Comparative Anatomy of Verte- 
brates; Microbiology; Genetics; Ecology. 



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// )'o;/ would rule the world quietly, you must keep it 
amused. 




26 




DR. JOHN H. SEMON 



B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 



Physical Science 1 and 11 Astronomy 40-43. 

The highest junction of the teacher coiisisted not so 

much in imparting knowledge as in stimulating the pupil 
in its lore and pursuit. 





27 




DORM MOTHERS 





OFFICE STAFF 

(A) MRS. FARMER, (B) MRS. MICHAELS, 
(G\ MRS. GREGORY, (D) MRS. WEEKS, 
(E) MRS. PIERCE, (F) SEATED: 

MRS. TOOHEY, STANDING: 

MRS. FAIRS, MRS. REED, MRS. RUSSETT 






28 



CHARLES H. McCANN REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 







TRAINING SCHOOLS 



DRURY HIGH SCHOOL 






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£L#ML— . *-j 



ADAMS HIGH SCHOOL 



MARK HOPKINS ELEMENTARY 





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Experience is regarded as a source of knowledge. It is 
also spoken of as containing what is known. Sometimes it 
is identified with sense-perception; sometimes it involves 
more — memory and the activity of the imagination. Some- 
times it includes thoughts, feelings, and desires as well, all 
the contents of consciousness, every phase of mental life. 

Experience may connote something which is private or 
public, subjective or objective — something which no man 
can share with another. Experience is said to be also that 
which makes a man expert in an art or in a sphere of 
practical activity. A man is better able to do or make that 
which he has much experience in doing or making. He 
is better able to judge what should be undertaken or 
what has been accomplished by others as well as by him- 
self. Ultimately, experience is something to be enjoyed for 
its own sake, serving no end beyond itself unless it be the 
enrichment of life by the widest variety of experience. 




MRS. CLAIRE M. BARRY 



MISS PRENDERGAST, MISS DAILEY, MISS 
BROWN, MISS STEVENSON, MRS. CALVI, MRS. 
WESTON. 



MR. CURRAN, DR. TOPOROWSKI, MISS CROW- 
LEY, MISS CHODNICKI, MR. SULLIVAN, MR. 
MENARDI. 




in 



SENIORS 




N 




SUSAN ARTHUR AGOSTINI 

19 Manning St., Williamstown, Mass. 
Common sense is the measure of the 

possible. 
Honor Society 2,3.4, Yearbook Staff 4, 
Student Voice Editor-in-chief 3, Ta- 
conah 1,2,3 Literary ed. 3, Class Secre- 
tary 3,4, Public Relations 1, N.E.T.P.A. 
Conf. 3, Stunt Night Judge 1,2,3,4, 
Orientation Comm. 3,4, Winter Carnival 
Comm. 3, Prom Comm. 2,3, Who's 
Who 4, Student N.E.A. 1,2,3,4, Philos- 
ophy Club 4, Pres. of Friends of Art. 





DOROTHY ALLEN 

Alden Road, Belchertown, Mass. 

Sing we for love and idleness nought 

else is worth the having. 
Band 3,4, Glee Club 3,4, C.A.-Public 
Rel. 4, Harlequin 3,4, Orientation 
Comm. 4, Wheelock College 1,2, Winter 
Carnival Comm. 3, S. N.E.A. 4, Dorm 
Council-Social Chairman, Stunt Night 
3,4, W.R.A. 3,4. 



BERNARD F. BARTNICKI 

122 Locust St., Danvers, Mass. 
Beware lest you lose the substance by 

grasping at the shadow. 
Science Club 1,2,3,4, Newman Club 2,3, 
4, M.A.A. 1,2,3,4, Kappa Delta Phi 1, 
2,3,4, Stunt Night 3,4, Eastern States 
Science Conference 2,3,4. 




BERNARD JOHN BELOUIN 

90 Washington Ave., North Adams, 

Mass. 

Do what is easy as if it were difficult 

and what is difficult as if it were easy. 

Honor Society 2.3,4, Bookstore 2,3,4, 

Newman Club 3.4, Science Club 2,3,4, 

Winter Carnival Comm. 3. 





<4^. 



CYNTHIA CATHLEEN BLOOD 
72 Yale St., North Adams, Mass. 
Activity is the only road to knowledge. 
W.R.A. 1,2,3,4, Glee Club 1, Halloween 
Dance Coram. 1, Parent's Day Tea 
Comm. 1, Harlequin 1,2,3,4 Sec.-Treas. 
4, Delta Psi Omega 4, N.E.A. 4, M.T.A. 
4, Stunt Night 2,3, Yearbook Staff 4, 
Soph. Prom Comm. 2, Soph. Prom 
Court 2, Winter Carnival Court, "South 
Pacific" 1, Christmas Play 1, Student- 
Faculty Play Stage Manager 4. 




NEAL ANTHONY BOMBARDIER 

49 Davenport St., North Adams, Mass. 

Much wisdom often goes with fewest 

words. 

Newman Club 1,2, Delta Psi Omega 4, 

Taconah 4, "Brigadoon" 2, "Death 

Takes a Holiday" 2, "South Pacific" 3. 



JOSEPH S. BUCKOWSKI 
175 Grove St., Northampton, Mass. 
Silence is the essential condition of 
happiness. 
Baseball 1,2,3,4, Soccer 3,4, M.A.A. 1, 
2,3,4, Winter Carnival Sports Comm. 3, 
Decoration Comm. 3, Intramural Bas- 
ketball 3,4. 




JOSEPH CAMPEDELLI 
1 15 Phelps Ave., North Adams, Mass. 
Ruling is easy, governing difficult. 
Newman Club 1,2,3,4, Current Events 
Club 2,3,4 President 3, Student Council 
3,4 Vice President 4, Yearbook Staff 4, 
New England Conference 4, Who's Who 
4, Stunt Night 3,4, Winter Carnival 
Comm. 3, Special Events Comm. 3, 
S. N.E.A. 4, Mountain Day Comm. 4, 
Chairman Assembly Comm. 



35 



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WILMA CLARK 

227 South Main St., Lanesboro, Mass. 

The pursuit of the perfect then is the 

pursuit of sweetness and light. 

W.R.A. 3,4, S.N.E.A. 1,2,3,4, Newman 

Club 1,2. 



ANNE MARIE DAUGHAN 

Latisquama Road, Southboro, Mass. 

The woman that deliberates is lost. 





DIANE SUTTON DILEGO 

93 Church St., North Adams, Mass. 

Calm soul of all things. 

Honor Society 3,4, Winter Carnival 2,3, 

Blithe Spirit 3, Taconah 2,3, Art Club 

4, Keuka College 1. 



ELLEN DOBROWOLSKI 
23 Temple St., Adams, Mass. 
Common sense is instinct and enough 
of it is genius. 
Science Club 1,2,3,4 Secretary 3,4, Hon- 
or Society 2,3,4 Secretary 3 President 4, 
Eastern States Science Conference 1, 
Student Council 4, Chemistry & Mathe- 




BARBARA DONLIN 

59 Kemp Ave., North Adams, Mass. 

In cheerfulness is the success of our 
studies. 
W.R.A. 2,3,4, Winter Carnival Comm. 
3, Stunt Night 3, S.N.E.A. 4. 




9 






ADRIEN JOHN DUBREUIL 

3 Arnold Lane, North Adams, Mass. 
Fame is the thirst of youth. 



MARIANNE DUFFY 
139 Prospect St., North Adams, Mass. 
/ love the life I live, and I live the life 
I love. 
Class Vice-Pres. 1,2,3,4, Student Coun- 
cil 3,4, Orientation Comm. 2,3,4 Chair- 
man 4, Current Events Club 3,4, Science 
Club 2, Student Voice 3, Newman Club 
1,2, Who's Who 4, Vice Pres. S.T.E.A. 
M., Mt. Day Chairman 4, Honor So- 
ciety 2,3,4, Yearbook Staff 4, Eastern 
States Science Conference 2, Repres. for 
Mass. on Board of Control of E.S.A. 
OF T.E. 3,4, Halloween Dance 1, Sopho- 
more Prom 2, Winter Carnival 3, 
S.N.E.A. Pres. 4 Sec.-Treas. 3. 




JAMES H. DYNES 

171 No. Summer St., Adams, Mass. 
It is only when zve forget our learning 

that we begin to know. 
Current Events Club 1,2,3,4 Vice Pres. 
3, M.A.A. 1,2,3,4, Newman Club 3, 
Float Comm., S.N.E.A. 



37 





THOMAS MICHAEL EARLY 

136 Heard St., Worcester, Mass. 

The strongest man upon the earth is he 

who stands most alone. 

Worcester State College 1,2, M.A.A. 3, 

4, Soccer 3,4, Intramural Basketball, 

Track 3, Kappa Delta Phi 3,4 Pledge 

President 3, Semper Phi 3,4, S.N.E.A. 

3,4, Parents Day 3. 



JOHN ROBERT ELDER 
19 Burt St., Adams, Mass. 
A man that will enjoy a quiet con- 
science must lead a quiet life. 
M.A.A. 1,2,3,4, Science Club 3,4, Win- 
ter Carnival 3. 



ROGER EURBIN 

11 Pearl St., Adams, Mass. 

A bird in the hand is worth what it 

will bring. 

Kappa Delta Phi 1,2,3,4 Secretary, 

Pledgemaster, National Rep., Soccer 3, 

4, S.N.E.A. 4, Baseball 2, Sophomore 

Prom Comm. 2, Halloween Dance 

Comm. 1, Winter Carnival Comm. 3, 

Stunt Night 2,3,4, M.A.A. 1,2,3,4. 



ANNE FLAMMIA 

40 Woodland Ave., Medford, Mass. 

Nothing is more sad than the death of 

an illusion. 

Glee Club 1, Newman Club 1,2,3,4 

Secretary 3 Vice Pres. 4, Dance Comm. 

1,2, S.N.E.A. 3,4, Yearbook Staff 4, 

Science Club 3,4, Eastern College 

Science Conf. 3, Dorm Council 3,4 Vice 







*%>** 






DONALD FRANK FLETCHER 

Lanesboro Rd., Cheshire, Mass. 

Discretion of speech is more than 

eloquence. 





-" 



1 




L 



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JAMES EDWARD FOSTER 

82 Chase Ave., North Adams, Mass. 

Good humor is goodness and wisdom 

combined. 

M.A.A. 1,2,3,4, Intramural Sports 2,3,4, 

Frosh Basketball 1, "South Pacific - ' 1. 



STANLEY F. FRYC 

95 Summer St., Adams, Mass. 

The greatest pleasure in life is doing 

what people say you cannot do. 

Current Events Club 3,4 Vice Prcs. 4, 

Winter Carnival Coram. 3, M.A.A. 1,2, 

3,4, Student N.E.A. 4, Yearbook Staff 4. 




ROBERT M. GEIER 

87 Middle Rd., Acushnet, Mass. 

Alan is made by his beliefs; as he believes 

so he is. 
Co-ed-in-chief of Yearbook 4, Kappa 
Delta Phi 1,2,3,4 Treasurer 2 Secretary 
3,4, Delta Psi Omega 3,4, Harlequin 3, 
4, Student N.E.A. 4, Soph. Prom Comm. 
2, Winter Carnival 3, Stunt Night 2,3, 
Student Council 4, Christian Assoc. 4. 



39 






DONALD F. GEISLER 

39 Friend St., Adams, Mass. 

It is the mark of genius not to astonish 

but to be astonished. 

S.N.E.A. 4, Current Events Club 3,4 

Treasurer 4, Stunt Night 2,3,4, Yearbook 

Staff 4, Winter Carnival Snow Sculpture 

Comm. 3. 



RAYNARD A. GETTY 

12 Depot St., Adams, Mass. 
No question is so difficult to answer as 
that to which the answer is obvious. 
Science Club 1,2,3,4, Science Conf. 1,2, 
President Science Club, Science Fair 3, 
Student Council 2, Experimenter 3,4, 
Yearbook Staff 4 Class Photographer, 
M.A.A. 1,2,3,4. 



ROBERT A. GOEWEY 
Kabatchnick Rd., Chester, Mass. 
With thyself keep ever face to face. 

Science Club 1,2,3,4, M.A.A. 1,2,3,4, 

Science Fair 3, Experimenter 4. 





BETTYE JOHNSON GOODNOW 

17 Wolcott St., Medford, Mass. 
They are never alone that are accom- 
panied with noble thoughts. 
Dormitory Council 1, Glee Club 1, 
Sophomore Prom 2 Queen's Court, Cur- 
rent Events Club 3,4, Orientation 





WAYNE WESTON GOODNOW 
R.F.D. no. 1, Shclburnc Falls, Mass. 
Every man is the architect of his own 
future. 
Tufts College 1, Soccer 2,3,4 Co-Capt. 
4, Basketball 2,3,4, M.A.A. 2,3,4, S.N.E. 
A. 3,4, Honor Society 3,4, Orientation 
Comm. 4, Traditions Court 4, Intra- 
mural Basketball Coach 3,4, Class Presi- 
dent 4, Student Council 4, Current 
Events Club 3,4, Yearbook Staff 4, 
Parents Day Comm. 3, Winter Carnival 
Comm. 3, Sophomore Prom Comm. 2, 
N.Y. Teachers Conf. 3. 




MARIO SOUZA JARDIN 

265 Nash Rd., New Bedford, Mass. 

/ have the simplest tastes. I am always 

satisfied with the best. 
Kappa Delta Phi 2,3,4 Vice President 2, 
Newman Club 1,2, Science Club 2, Cur- 
rent Events Club 3,4, Student Gov't 
Conf. 4, S.N.E.A. 4, Student Council 
Pres. 4, Yearbook Staff 4, Stunt Night 
2,3,4, Who's Who 4, Orientation Comm. 
3, Winter Carnival Comm. 3. 



BONITA A. JILLSON 

198 State Rd., North Adams, Mass. 

Can we ever have too much of a good 

thing? 

Stunt Night 1,2,3,4, Winter Carnival 3, 

Soph. Prom Comm. 2, Taconah 1,2, 

Yearbook Staff 4, W.R.A. 1,2,3,4. 




KAREN JORGENSEN 
Robbins Road, Harwich Port, Mass. 
There is no cosmetic for beauty like 
happiness. 
Freshman Orientation Court 1, Sopho- 
more Prom Queen 2, Winter Carnival 
Court 2, Taconah 3, Public Relations 3, 
New York Ed. Conf. 3,4, Winter Carni- 
val Queen 4, Honor Society 4, Student 
Council Sec. 4, Harlequin 1,2,3.4, Delta 
Psi Omega 3,4 Secretary-Treasurer 3,4, 
Yearbook Staff 4. 



41 








JULIA J. KURPIEL 

185 Columbia St., Adams, Mass. 

Science is the literature of truth. 
Science Club 1,2,3,4, Science Confer- 
ence 1, Honor Society 3,4, Winter Carni- 
val 3 Publicity, Science Fair 3,4, Ex- 
perimenter 3,4, W.R.A. 1,2,3,4. 



ELIZABETH DIANE LAINO 

1706 Curran Highway, North Adams, 

Mass. 
The only unhappiness is a life of bore- 
dom. 
Glee Club 1, Halloween Dance 1, New- 
man Club 1,2,3,4, Harlequin 1,2,3,4 
Vice Pres. 3, Stunt Night 1,2,3,4, Sopho- 
more Prom Comm. 2, Winter Carnival 

3, Delta Psi Omega 3,4, Public Relations 

4, S.N.E.A. 4, Christmas Play 3, "Out- 
ward Bound" 2, Yearbook Staff 4. 



RUTH J. LAMBERT 
4 Lambert Terrace, Adams, Mass. 
No limit but the sky. 
Glee Club 1,2,3,4, Winter Carnival 
Comm. 3, Halloween Dance Comm. 1, 
Christmas Party 3,4, "The Little Foxes" 
Pi blicity 2, Science Club 4, Science Fa 
3, Baccalaureate 2, W.R.A. 1,2,3,4. 




RUTH ANNE LEAB 
Main St., Hancock, Mass. 
Do whatever you do intensely. 
Freshman Court 1, Dorm Council 3 
Treasurer, Orientation Comm. 3,4, 
Christian Assoc. 2,3,4 Secretary 2 
Treasurer 4, Glee Club 1,2, Stunt Night 
2,3,4, Freshman Dance 1, Sophomore 
Prom 2, Winter Carnival 3, W.R.A. 




1g ' — ** *• 



AMELIA GRAZIANI LEITCH 

Main Street, Cheshire, Mass. 

An ounce of work is worth many 

pounds of words. 

Honor Society 2,3,4 Treasurer 4, W.R.A. 

,2,3,4, Sophomore Prom Coram. 2, 

South Pacific" 2, Glee Club 2. 





MARIE ANGELA LINGOSKI 

50 Riverview Ave., Pittsfield, Mass. 

It is in human nature to think wisely 
and to act in absurd fashion. 
Halloween Dance 1 Publicity 1, Stunt 
Night 1,2,3,4, "South Pacific" 1, Ta- 
conah 2,3,4 Special Features Ed. 3, 
Yearbook Staff 4, Newman Club 3,4 
Vice Pres. 3 President 4, Orientation 
Comm. 3,4 Secretary 4, Student Coun- 
cil 4. 



THOMAS LOFTUS 

979 Main St., Worcester, Mass. 
The direction in which education starts 
a man will determine his future life. 
M.A.A. 1,2,3,4, Intramural 1,2,3, Bas- 
ketball. 






FRANCIS "PONCHO" MACH 

Windsor Rd., Cheshire, Mass. 

Every man is or hopes to be an idler. 

Science Club 3,4, Honor Society 3,4, 

Science Fair 3. 



43 



J^' m 




<*- 




KAREN L. MADISON 
42 Lincoln St., Webster, Mass. 
Opinions can not survive if one has no 
chance to fight for them. 
Sophomore Prom Comm. 2, Winter 
Carnival Comm. 3, Honor Society 3,4, 
Mountain Day 4, Stunt Night 3,4, Cur- 
rent Events Club 3,4 President 4, Stu- 
dent Council 4, Mass. Student Gov't 
Day 4, S.N.E.A. 4, W.R.A. 1,2,3,4, Year- 
book Staff 4. 



ROBERT H. MAHER 

25 Beech St., North Adams, Mass. 

Be brief , for no discourse can please 

when too long. 

Science Club 1,2,3,4 President 3, Honor 

Society 2,3,4 Vice Pres. 4, Science Fair 

3, M.A.A. 1,2,3,4. 





JOHN ROBERT MAHONEY 

30 Riverview Circle, Wayland, Mass. 

Few things are impossible to diligence 
and skill. 
Basketball Mgr. 3,4, Soccer Mgr. 3, 
Science Club 1,2,3,4, Eastern States 
Science Conf. 3, Science Fair 3, Orien- 
tation Comm. 4, Newman Club 4, Stunt 
Night 3,4, Winter Carnival 3, S.N.E.A. 
2,4, Yearbook Staff 4. 



MARY LOUISE MASTON 

41 Branch St., Pittsfield, Mass. 

What one knows is, in youth of little 

moment; they know enough who know 

how to learn. 

Newman Club 1,2,3,4 Treasurer 3, 

Science Club 3,4, Glee Club 1,2,3,4, 

Winter Carnival Comm. 3, S.N.E.A. 3,4, 

Mathematics Award 3, Yearbook Staff 

4, Honor Society 3,4, Eastern States 




MARK N. MATTHEWS 

315 Ashland St., North Adams, Mass. 

Let thy speech be short comprehending 

much in few words. 

M.A.A. 1,2,3,4. 





marcia McCarthy 

392 Church Street, North Adams, Mass. 




ROBERT HENRY McMENEMY, JR. 

450 Newton St., Northboro, Mass. 

The secret of happiness is curiosity. 
Honor Society 2,3,4, Student Council 
3,4 Ass't Treas. 3 Treasurer 4, Kappa 
Delta Phi 3,4, Who's Who 4, M.A.A. 
1,2,3,4, Intramural Sports 2,3, United 
Fund 3, Special Projects 3, N.E.T.P.A. 
Conf. 4, Mt. Day Comm. 4, Orientation 
Comm. 4, Newman Club 1,2, Snow 
Sculpture 3, Yearbook Staff 4, Dance 
Comm. 1,2,3,4. 



JOY M. MELANSON 
Richmond St., Cheshire, Mass. 
The result of the educative process is 
the capacity for further education. 
Westfield State College 1,2, Junior-Sen- 
ior Prom Comm. 3, Winter Carnival 
Comm. 3, W.R.A. 1,2,3,4. 



45 








WALTER R. MENDEL 

23 West St., Adams, Mass. 

High erected thoughts seated in the 

heart of courtesy. 

Honor Society 2,3,4, M.A.A. 1,2,3,4. 




BENJAMIN MORANDI, JR. 

23 Hooker St., North Adams, Mass. 
Nothing great was ever achieved 
without enthusiasm. 
Soccer 1,2,3,4 Captain 3 Co-captain 4, 
Sophomore Class President, Student 
Council 2, Intramural Basketball 2,3,4, 
Kappa Delta Phi 2,3,4, Orientation 
Comm. 2,3, Radio Club 2,3, S.N.E.A. 4. 



RICHARD R. MOREAU 

566 State Rd., North Adams, Mass. 

There is nothing worth the wear of 

winning but laughter and the love of 

friends. 

Science Club 1,2, Stunt Night 3,4, 

Orientation Comm. 4, M.A.A. 1,2,3,4. 



CARYL ZAJAC MORGAN 
82 Lincoln St., Pittsfield, Mass. 
The test of a vocation is the love of the 
drudgery it involves. 
Current Events 1 Secretary 2, Newman 
Club 1,2, Drama Club 1,2, President 2, 
Student Gov't Conf. 2, Freshman Orient. 
2, Sophomore Prom Comm. ' 2, Winter 
Carnival Queen 2, Stunt Night 1,2, 
S.N.E.A. 4, Philosophy Club 4, Year- 
book Staff 4. 






ROBERT S. MORTON 

294 Shawshun Ave., Wilmington, Mass. 
Young men have a passion for regard- 
ing elders as senile. 
President Junior Class, S.N.E.A. 4, Who's 
Who 4, Student-Faculty Social Comm. 
3,4, Intramural Sports 1,2,3,4, M.A.A. 
1,2,3,4, Student Council 3,4 Constitu- 
tion 3 Chairman 4 Social Calendar 3,4 
Chairman 4, Debating Club 3,4 Vice 
Pres. 3 President 4. 



JOHN P. MOZDEN 

5 Griffin St., Bondsville, Mass. 
A part of kindness consists in loving 
people more than they deserve. 
Baseball 2,3,4, Soccer 2,3,4, M.A.A. 2,3, 
4, Intramural Basketball 2,3,4, Winter 
Carnival 3, Student Voice 4 Sports Ed. 
4, Yearbook Staff 4. 



ARTHUR JAMES NIARCHOS 
79 Harvard St., Pittsfield, Mass. 

It is completely unimportant; that's 
why it is so interesting. 
Stunt Night 1, M.A.A. 1,2,3,4, Winter 
Carnival 3, Jr.-Sr. Prom Comm. 3. 




JUDITH DARYL PATASHNICK 

52 Johnson St., North Adams, Mass. 

In cheerfulness is the success of our 
studies. 
Cheerleader 1,2, Orientation 2,3,4 Sec- 
retary 3 Chairman 4, Canterbury Club 
2,3,4, S.N.E.A. 3,4 Vice Pres. 3, 
S.N.E.A. Treas. 4, Queen's Court 2, 
Student Council 4, Who's Who 4, 
Honor Society 4, S.T.E.A.M. State Sec. 
4, N.E.A. Conf. 3,4. 



47 





': 



ROBERT B. PHELPS 

New Ashford, Mass. 
The happiest of all lives is a busy 
solitude. 
Science Club 1,2,3,4. 





KATHERINE COBURN 
PORROVECCHIO 

Box 84, Charlemont, Mass. 
A sunny nature wins lasting friendship 
everywhere. 
WRA President 3, Head of sports (for 
WRA) 2, Cheerleader 1,2, Dorm Council 
2, Student Council 3, Sophomore Prom 
Comm. 2, Winter Carnival Comm. 3. 
Prom 2, Current Events Club 3,4-Sec- 



MARIANNE PROULX 

49 Manomet Street, Brockton, Mass. 
The doer alone learneth. 
Glee Club 1, Decoration Comm. -Soph. 
Prom. 2, Current Events Club 3,4-Sec- 
retary 4, Stunt Night 3,4, S.N.E.A. 4, 
Queen's Pageant Comm. -Winter Carni- 
val 3, Dorm Council Rep. 4, Newman 
Club 3, Yearbook Staff-Clubs 4, Class 
Representative 3. 



DOROTHY GIUSTI RANSFORD 

29 Holbrook Street, North Adams, Mass. 

Imagination is the eye of the soul. 

Co-ed. -in-chief of Yearbook 4, Harlequin 

1, Soph. Prom Comm. (Dec. chairman) 

2, Winter Carnival Comm. 3, Junior Sr. 
Prom Comm. 3, Stunt Night 1,2,3, New- 
man Club 2,3, Student Council 4, Stu- 
dent Voice 3. Taconah (art Ed.) 2.3,4, 
Who's Who 4, Orientation Comm. 3, 
S.N.E.A. 4, Sophomore Prom Court 2, 







NANCY ANNE RICE 

Berlin Road, Williamstown, Mass. 
Wit is the salt of conversation. 
Newman Club 1, W.R.A. 1,2,3,4 Presi- 
dent 4, Student Council 4, S.N.E.A. 4, 
Honor Society 1,2,3,4, Stunt Night 2,3,4, 
Mountain Day Coram. 4. 




LENORE LUNDIN RICHARDS 
126 Pleasant St., Fairhaven, Mass. 
All experience is an arch to build upon. 
Freshman Reception Queen 1, Christian 
Association 1,2, Orientation Coram. 2, 
3,4, Stunt Night 3,4, Yearbook Staff 4, 
W.R.A. 1,2,3,4 Vice Prcs. 3, S.N.E.A. 3. 



THOMAS BAIRNER SCOTT, III 

419 Church St., North Adams, Mass. 
My mind let go a thousand things like 
dates of wars and deaths <>/ Kings. 
Freshman Orientation 2, Basketball 1, 
Baseball 1,2, Soccer 1,2,3,4, Radio Club 
1, Intramurals 2,3,4, Kappa Delta Phi 
2,3,4, S.N.E.A. 4, M.A.A. 1,2,3,4. 




CATHERINE LOUISE SHEA 

20 Maple St., Dalton, Mass. 
In cheerfulness is the success of our 
studies. 
W.R.A. 3,4. 

49 






RUTH MARIAN STARRATT 
River Rd., Route 19, North Adams, 
Mass. 
Always do right; this will gratify some 
people and astonish the rest. 
W.R.A. 1,2,3,4 Council 3 Public Re- 
lations 3 Sports Chairman 4, Christian 
Association 1,2,3,4 President 4, Student 
Council 4, Honor Society 2,3,4 Treasurer 
3, Taconah 2,3,4 Current Event Ed. 3, 
Glee Club 1,2, S.N.E.A. 4, Student 
Gov't Conf. 4. 



BEATRICE MARY STEADY 

84 Northumberland Rd., Pittsfield, 
Mass. 
It is better to ask some of the questions 
than to know all the answers. 
Glee Club 1,2,3,4 Band 2,3,4 Canter- 
bury Club 2,3,4 (pres. 3), Winter Carni- 
val 3, W.R.A. 1,2,3,4, Orientation 
Comm. 3,4, Parents Weekend Comm. 
3, Student Council 3, S.N.E.A. 4, Stu- 
dent Govt. Conf. 3 



DORIA SWEENEY 

4 Morningview Drive, Pittsfield, Mass. 

The terrible burden of having nothing 

to do. 

W.R.A. 1,2,3,4, Harlequin 1,2,3,4, Delta 

Psi Omega 2,3,4, Newman Club 1,3,4, 

Dance Comm. 1,2,3,4, Yearbook Staff 

3,4, S.N.E.A. 4, Winter Carnival Comm. 

3. 




VIRGINIA ANN SWIATEK 

34 Crotteau Street, Adams, Mass. 

The difficulty in life is the choice. 
Sophomore Dame Comm. 2, Winter 
Carnival Comm. 3, Treasurer of W.R.A. 
3, Sec. Huniii Society 4, Treasurer Sr. 
Class. Honor Society 1.2.3.4, Bus. Man. 

Yearbook Staff -1. 






*^v 




DOLORES TAYLOR 

12 Chase Street, Dennisport, Mass. 

A philosopher is one who doubts. 
WRA 1,2,3,4, Stunt Night 2.3, S.N.E.A. 4, 
Yearbook Staff 4, Taconah 3,4, Friends 
of Art 4, Glee Club 1, "South Pacific" 1. 




ROBERT CHARLES TAYLOR 
117 Connecticut Ave., Pittsficld, Mass. 
A simple life is its men reward. 
Honor Society 2,3.4, Physics Achieve- 
ment Award 2, Science Club 3,4. 



HAROLD THOMAS WILLIAMS 
75 Mt. Pleasant St., Milford, Mass. 
Accept life and you must accept regret. 
Soccer 1,2,3, Baseball 1,3,4, Harlequin 
1,4, Student N.E.A., M.A.A. 1.2,3,4 
Class Repres. 2.3, Jr. Varsity Basketball 
1 Captain 1, Kappa Delta Phi 1,2,3,4 
Vice Pres. 2 President 4. "South Pacific" 
Parents Day 3, Intramural Basketball 3, 
4 Coach 3,4. 




M. PETER WRIGHT 

Halls Ground, Clarkesburg. Mass. 

All wealth is the product of labor. 

Harlequin 1,2,3,4 Delta Psi Omega 3.4 

President 3,4, Kappa Delta Phi 1,2,3.4. 

Soccer 1,2,3, Philosophy Club 4. 



EDWARD R. BLEAU 

16 McCauley Lane, Williamstown, Mass. 

Knowledge is power. 

Frank Fuller Murdock Honor Society 2,3, 

4 ; Philosophy Club 4. 



KATHLEEN A. CANDE 

279 Pittsfield Rd. 

Lenox, Mass. 

You can't impose education on anyone. 



ROBERT C. FALLON 

45 North St., North Adams, Mass. 

Be slow of tongue and quick of eye. 
MAA 2,3,4; Science Club 2,3,4 Pres. 4; 
Student Council 4; Science Fair 4; Honor 
Society 3,4; Experimenter 3,4. 



JAMES JOHN HANCHETT 

210 California Avenue 

Pittsfield, Mass. 

Silence is deep as eternity, 

speech is shallow as time. 



CLARENCE PERRY 

52 Highland Avenue, Adams, Mass. 

Be not the slave of words. 

Dean's List 1,2,3,4; Frank Fuller Murdock 

Honor Society; Science Club Publication 

Editor 3,4; Science Fair 3. 



DONALD S. REYNOLDS 

78 Wellington Ave. 

Pittsfield, Mass. 

Misery is almost always the result of 

thinking. 



JOSEPH L. WOOD, JR. 

38 Hampshire St.. Pittsfield, Mass. 

He who has courage to laugh is almost as 

much the master of the world as he who 

is ready to die. 



S9 




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■hi 



UNDERCLASSMEN 



FRESHMAN CLASS 





HOLLY HITT, Sec. 
JERRY HAMILTON, Pres. 



BARBARA GIUSTI, Treas. 
MARY LOU BREWER, Public Re. 



The glory of novelty is short lived. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 




DON CARRIER, Prcs. 
PENNEY WRIGHT, Sec. 



JUDY BENEDETTI, Vice-Pres. 
PETE ABUSE Treas. 



Those who work much do not work hard. 




JUNIOR CLASS 




BOB COOLIDGE, Treas. 
SHARRON COLLINS, Sec. 



BILL DUFFY, Vice-Pres. 
LARRY GOSS, Pres. 



MISS LANOE, Advisor 




SENIOR OFFICERS 




BETTE LAINO, Public Relations 
WAYNE GOODNOW, President 



VIRGINIA SWIATEK, Treasurer 
MARIANNE DUFFY, Vice-President 



SUSAN AGOSTINI, Secretary 



59 



ORGANIZATIONS 



YEARBOOK STAFF 



**>\ 





DOROTHY RANSFORD — ROBERT 

GEIER, Co-Editors 
VIRGINIA SWIATEK, Business Manager 
ROBERT McMENEMY — MARIE 

LINGOSKI, Art Editors 
RAYMOND GETTY, Glass Photographer 




62 



STUDENT COUNCIL 




MARIO JARDIN, Pros. 
KAREN JOROENSEN, Sec. 



JOSEPH CAMPEDELLI, Vice-Pres. 

ROBERT McMENENY, Treas. 



The Student Council works for the general welfare of the student body; the best interest 
of the college, and sponsors extracurricular activities. 




fi3 



ORIENTATION COMMITTEE 




JUDITH PATASHNICK, Chairman 
ROBERT GENTILE, Treasurer 



MARIE LINGOSKI, Secretary 
CARLETON SMITH, Public Relations Dir. 



The function of the Orientation Committee is to acquaint the incoming freshman class 
with the college surroundings, rules, regulations, and the upperclassmen. 




DORM 
COUNCIL 

ANNE FLAMMIA, Pres. 
GAIL DAVIDSON, Vice-Pres 
PEGGY SPAFFORD, Sec. 
JANICE MARSHALL, Treas. 
DOTTIE ALLEN, Social Chair. 
REPRESENTATIVES: 
Si\ Marianne Proulx 
Jr. Carol Waters 
Soph. Marsha Purtcll 
Fresh. Mirai Gryi 



The object of the council is to 
work co-operatively with the dorm 
residents in creating and maintaining 
a wholesome and happy living unit 
in the dorm. 



T 



I* 







TACONAH 



DOLORES ZIEMINSKI, Editor STAFF: Donald Horton, Marie Lingoski, Marion 
Fowler, Dorothy Ransford, Dorothy Carlo, Ncal Bombardier, Carole McDonald, 
Carolyn Reed, Paul Milenski, Charles Corbiere. 

The purpose of the Taconah is to offer students an opportunity to publish their creative 
literary works. 




STUDENT VOICE 

PATRICIA CALLAN - - FRANK RYAN, Editors-in-Chief, DENNY ZICHO - 
JOHN MOZDEN, Sports, CHERRYL MURPHY, Art, PENN WRIGHT - 
JUDY BENEDETTI, Assistants, CAROL O'CONNELL, Circulation. 

The purpose of Student Voice is to publish in newspaper format, school news, current 




HONOR SOCIETY 



ELLEN DOBROWOLSKI, Pres. 
VIRGINIA SWIATEK, Sec. 



ROBERT MAHER, Vice-Pres. 
MARGARET KURPIEL, Treas. 



The goal of the Honor Society is to give scholarship and leadership a place of high es- 
teem in the eyes of the student body. 





DEBATING SOCIETY 



ROBERT MORTON, Pres. 
BRIAN JURKOWSKI, Treas. 



DONALD HORTON, Vice-Pres. 
DENNIS ZICHO, Sec. 



The goal of the Debating Society is to develop the student's mind through the formal 

structure of debate. 

66 




HARLEQUIN 

RICHARD WATSON, Pres. 
CYNTHIA BLOOD, Vice-Pres. 



The purpose of Harlequin is to 
provide dramatic entertainment for 
college functions and to promote the 
interests of the theatre amongst the 
student body. 



DELTA PSI 
OMEGA 



PETER WRIGHT, Pres. 
KAREN JORGENSEN, Sec- 

Treas. 



The dramatic fraternity serves as a 
reward for those students who have 
done work of merit and of quality in 
dramatics. The fraternity produced a 
student-faculty play, Gore Vidal's 
"Visit to A Small Planet" in 1964. 




£7 




GLEE CLUB 



ANN CAIN — Pres. 

DOROTHY HAWKES, Sec.-Treas. 



MICHAEL PENSIVY — Vice-Pres. 
LINDA PAGONAS, Public Rel. 



The Glee Club's purpose is to provide musical entertainment for college activities. 




STATESMEN 

Michael Pensivy, Richard Cain, Gerald Hamilton, Carl Little. 



68 




KAPPA DELTA PHI 



HAROLD WILLIAMS, Prcs. 
ROBERT GEIER, Sec. 



WILLIAM McXEIL, Vice-Pres. 
BERNARD BARTNICKI, Treas. 
ROBERT LINTON, Pledgemaster 



The aim of the fraternity is to bring male members of the college into closer social 
relationships, and to promote high educational ideals among the students. 




JACK HUGHES, Pres. 
FRANK GOTELY, Sec. 



CIRCLE K 



ROBERT JOHNSON, Vice-Pres. 
JACK DALY, Treas. 



The purpose of the club is that of service to the community and the college. K"s objective 
is to instill the qualities of citizenship and leadership to its' members. 




CURRENT EVENTS CLUB 



KAREN MADISON, Pres. 
MELBA VIEIRA, Public Relations 
DONALD GEISLER, Treas. 



STANLEY FRYC, Vice-Pres. 
MARIANNE PROULX, Sec. 



The Current Events Club works to give students an opportunity to expound and exchange 
their ideas and attitudes on current situations. 




SCIENCE CLUB 



STANLEY STEFANIK, Pres. 
MARGARET KURPIEL, Treas. 



ELLEN DOBROWOLSKI, Executive Sec. 
FRANCIS MACH, Public Relations 



The Science Club serves to foster interest in the sciences and promote an exchange of 



ideas amongst its members. 



7n 





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l* «*-» 


1 Kf Wj 


- 



M.A.A. OFFICERS 



TIMOTHY CARROLL, Pres. 
GEOFFREY FREER, Sec. 



WILLIAM DUFFY, Vice-Pres. 
GEORGE FITZPATRICK, Treas. 



The M.A.A.'s purpose is to support and stimulate the athletic activities in the college. 




W.R.A. 
OFFICERS 



NANCY RICE, Pros. 
CLAIRE SHEA,. 1st Vice-Pres. 
NANCY BRAY, 2nd Vice-Pres. 
MARCIA ASHLEY, Treas. 



The purpose of the Women's Rec- 
reation Association is to inculcate 
ideals of service, sportsmanship, sta- 
bility, and scholarship in the lives of 
the women students of the college. 




CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



CAROLE McDONALD, Pres. 



LYNNE RYDER, Vice-Pres. 



To promote and establish a spiritual and wholesome social relationship among the Protes- 
tant students. 




NEWMAN CLUB 



MARIE LINGOSKI, Pres. 
ROBERT BOUCHER, Publicity 



NANCY ALLEN, Sec. 



ANNE FLAMMIA, Vice-Pres. 
WILLIAM YANUSAS, Treas. 



The Newman Club fosters the spiritual, intellectual, and social growth of the Roman 
Catholic students of the State College at North Adams. 




CHEERING SQUAD 

CAPTAIN: Patti Girgenti, Nancy Bray, Maureen Kelliher. Betty Townshend, Kcnna 
Andrews, Betsy Quinn, Penny Wright. ALTERNATES: Jo- Anne Troia, Sally Tetlo. 

The purpose of the Cheerleaders is to encourage school spirit at the college sports events. 



CANTERBURY CLUB 



MURIEL MOORE, Pres. 



JEAN SLANEY, Sec.-Treas. 



The purpose of the Canterbury Club is to bring all Anglican students together in formal 
and informal situations in order that they may come to a better understanding of their 
religion. 



73 



SPORTS 



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i 


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TRACK 





77 



North Adams 

Chenail Sets Pace 
Against Waterbury 

North Adams State College opened its 1963-64 bas 
ketball season with a not too impressive win over the Wa 
terbury branch of the University of Connecticut, 77-72, a 
Hoosac Hall gym. 

A packed house watched the inaugural of the cour 
season in Northern Berkshire. 



Fouls Decide 

Foul shooting made the dif- 
ference last night as Coach 
George Jarck's Mohawks drop- 
ped in 19 of 31 charity tosses 
against 10 for 22 by the visitors. 

Waterbury outscored the home 
team from the floor, 31-29. The 
lid is on could well be the theme 
last night as both teams, ob- 
viously suffering from first 
game jitters, hit rather poorly 
from the floor. North Adams 
made good of 29 of 90 shots or 
30 per cent and Waterbury con- 
nected on 31 of 85 about 36 per 
cent. 

Height was not a factor last 
night as neither side floored 
what could be called a tall team. 
In the first half Waterbury was 
in control of the boards, but 
the picture was reversed in the 
second half. 

Jim Chenail, labeled "the big 
fellow" by the Waterbury play- 
ers when they huddled with their 
coach, Jim Nemec from time to 
time during the game, was the 
pace setter for the Mohawks in 
scoring, 17 points on six baskets 
and. five fouls and in rebounds. 

Capt. Frank Zoltek rallied 
from a very cold first half to 
pump in 13 the same as Ronnie 
Pietras. Bruce Gallagher hit for 
11, 12, Timmy Carroll for 11 and 
Wayne Goodnow for 10. 

Craig DeCerb was high for 
Waterbury with 16. Four other 
fellows hit double figures. 
Rally Needed 

North Adams had to come 
from behind to win, trailing 
throughout the first half until 
with about a minute left to play 
back-to-back baskets by Pietras 
and Goodnow sent the Mohawks 
to the dressing room, leading 
by one, 36-35. 

Midway in the second half, 
the Mohawks got real hot for 
the first time and on a 10- 
point chain ran the count from 



44-42 to 54-42. Baskets by Good- 
now and Carroll a short time 
later gave the Mohawks their 
biggest spread, 58-45. 

Waterbury came back strong 
in the closing minutes and with 
1.47 left had cut the margin to 
three 71-68. CarrolFs hoop and 
two foul shots by Zoltek gave the 
home five breathing room in 
the closing seconds. 

North Adams played control 
ball for the most part in thi 
final five minutes, preferring to j 
move the ball around in a weave 
rather than go for the basket ; 
and this pattern made Waterbury 
commit fouls. 

North Adams will be at home 
next Saturday night to the Alum- 
ni 

Kennedy Tribute 

At the request of John J. 
Komorek of the faculty who was 1 
in charge of the public address j 
system, the entire assemblage ; 
stood in silence for one minute I 
at the start of the second half in I 
tribute to the late President John \ 
F. Kennedy. 
North Adams B F PJ 

Zoltek 3 7 IS 

Carroll 5 1 11 ! 

Gallagher 4 4 12 

Pietras 6 2 14 ! 

Chenail 6 5 17 j 

Gocdrow 5 10 

Mancivillano 

Kinne 

Fitzpatrick 

Desautels 



State College Sports 

North Adams Ready 
For Castleton Visit 



.415 1 
.404 1 
.385 l: 
.333 11 

esu'lts 

lesota 1 

O 3 
City 6 

hington 4 
Angeles 



North Adams 84, Windham 66 

North Adams State College Mo- 
hawks sharpened their toma-. 
hawks for the Castleton, Vt. in- 
vasion tomorrow night by whip- 
ping Windham, Vt., State Col- 
lege last night for the second 
time this season. It was an easy 
victory, too easy perhaps to sat- 
isfy Coach George Jarck. 
... If it should win tomorrow 
night, and it will be the 
favorite, North Adams will 
be odds favorite to win the 
Northern division title be- 
cause after that comes 
Keene and Johnson, Vt. both 
here and not regarded as 
able to give the Mohawks 
too much of a test. North 
Adams is 8-2 in the Confer- 
ence and riding the top of 
the crest. 

Castleton Game 
One of the two defeats suffer- 
ed by the Mohawks this season 
was up in Castleton and the local 
team is more than anxious for 
revenge. 

In winning last night, its 14th 
for the season against two loss- 
es and its 17th straight on the 
home court, the. Mohawks start- 
ed out early to do a job on 
Windham a team they like to 
beat, and hardly had the clock 
started moving before North Ad- 
ams was scoring. 

An 11-point skein sending the 
score to 25-11 left no doubt as 
to what the final outcome would 
be. At half time, North Adams 
led, 45-19. 

The home team tapered off in 
the final half and Windham scor- 
ing perked up a bit, but the 
lead was never in danger. 



North Adams hit on 31 of 72 
shots for .43 per cent, Windham 
24 of 71 for .33 per cent. The 



suits 

imore 2 

Angeles 3 
Mohawks shot an amazing 76 per r^T 3 _j 

cent from the free line, 20 of 26, ^ g ? 

Windham 16 of 28 for 57 per cent, g^^ \ 

The Mohawks grabbed 35 re- [, 

bounds to 21 for Windham. 



The summary: 

North Adams B F 

Zoltek 11 2 

Gallagher 5 6 

Pietras - 4 4 

Chenail 2 

Mancivilano 3 

Goodnow 1 

Kinne 1 2 

Meaney 1 2 

Carroll 3 

Fitzpatrick 1 3 

Desautels 1 

Totals 32 20 

Windham B F 

Virian 9 3 

Potter 3 2 

Robinson 1 2 

Johnson 7 4 

Chmura 3 3 

Oberg 

Stem 

Blatins 2 2 



s 
tines 

Cleveland, 
P fashington, 



:roit, N 
ames 

;ago, N 
,roit, N 
Cleveland, 

'ashington, 

ston, N 



sague 

L. Pet. G. 

.612 - 

.587 

.542 

.540 

.510 

.500 

.489 

.480 

.442 

.314 
tesults 
6 i Philadelpr. 



19 
""19 
84 22 
P 23 
2125 

8 25 
4 24 

18 26 

9 29 
0|35 



Totals 25 16 66 jlew York 2 

Score at half time, North Ad- pcago 5 
ams*45, Windham 19. Louls °> N 

„ „ , T . — ^burgh, pf 

Zoltek Leads 

Capt. Frankie Zoltek once 
again led his mates in scoring 
getting 24,21 of them in the first 
half. Bruce Gallagher and Ron- 
nie Pietras also went into double 
figures, 16 and 1,2 respectively. 
Gallagher picked off 12 rebounds, 
nine off the defensive board and 
three off the offensive. 

Capt. Tim Varian led Wind- 



>sults 
jkee 2 

Louis 6 

Philadelpr 



Totals 29 

Waterbury B 

Fitzmorris 1 

De Cerb 8 

Cwick 5 

Smyzer 6 

Vitals 3 

Schiliare 5 

Rutkowski 2 

Totals 31 

Score at half time — - 
Adams 36, Waterbury 35. 



State College 

Mohawks Score 
At Danbury State 

jl Although sluggish and playing Danbury trailing. At half time n 

below par, North Adams State J 'he score was tied 26-26. > COptaW 

_3ollege Mohawks survived a long Zoltek led the scorers with 21 *> Mass - (AP) 

72old bus drive and an even cold-' Carro11 had 18 - Joe Spinazola als<f en of Hoboke 

Northr shooting night to down Dan-j hit double figures, 13. n elected capts 

_ury State College, 73-60, last Tonv Gorman paced Danbury ^ Cross varsl 



19 
F 
2 

2 
1 
4 
1 


10 



burgh 3-6 
New York 
lgs, tie, ra; 
imes 

Francisco 

Los Angeles, 

Houston, N 

Games 

an Francisco, 

jw York, 2, U 

Los Angeles, 
Houston, 2, tv 

Philadelphia, 



North Adams TakesContest Trims Keene Ow 



78 




VARSITY 
BASKETBALL 



ft?W* 




to 








• ■ 
















BASEBALL 



MOHAWKS TAKE ELEVEN 

OUT OF FOURTEEN. 

RIGHT HANDER 

JOHN MOZDEN 

MISSES NO-HITTER AT 

LOWELL STATE 






■ ■HUH 








^M 







82 



/•• 




The beginning — A book of rules, hot dogs, beanies and 
demerits. Safari through the mud at fishpond — new 
faces — new friends. A new life is revealed • — Registration 
and the endless line at the bookstore — ■ Freshman Dance 
Lenore Richards is crowned queen — Most popular Frosh 
fellow — George Harriman — Classes — "Piercing 
Piercisms" — The "caf" The great campaign" is on with 
the winning ticket: George Harriman, Marianne Duffy, 
Laurie Chase, Dorothy Giusti Ransford, and Maureen 
Amaral — Halloween Dance — Haunted house — Warn- 
ings in the mail — JFK. elected President — Christmas 
Vacation — Raw nerves — exams' — second semester — - 
Orientation — Second place for Stunt Night — "The Wis- 
key Rebellion'' — Spring at last • — hems go up • — "South 
Pacific" — Free periods at Fish pond — Kappa Delta Phi 
comes to campus — Final exams — "NoDoze" — - picnics 

— We made it — unbelievable — Now to the beach — 
The summer passes — We have a new name — New 
fads a few new faces but we miss an old one here and there 

— the pressure is on — We seat ourselves firmly on our 
"Greek Curbstones" and dig in — Mr. Luddy shows us 
the ways of the United States — meanwhile — non stop 
around the world with Mr. Barden — Representing the 
class: Ben Morandi, Marianne Duffy, Laurie Chase, Dot 
Ransford, and Penny Agostini — Sophomore Prom — 
An ocean of delight and beauty — aquarium in the gym — 
Karen Jorgensen the mermaid queen — Tim Carroll's 
doorprize — Hortense — Madras — Chubby Checker — 
The twist — Winter came and a semester closed — Spring 

— the birds, the buds, new young love and Sutton Vane's 
"Outward Bound" — Bette became a bit British — An- 
other chance at Stunt Night — "The Hunley-Brinkley Re- 
port" — second place again — Finals at last — A little 
bedraggled — A happy summer — 





84 




September semester commenced one week later — Great 
joy — Class officers: Bob Morton, Marianne Duffy, Penny 
Agostini, Dot G. Ransford and Karen Jorgensen — Greater 
intellectual freedom — wider scope of electives — Cur- 
riculum with J.J.K. - - Beautiful bulletin boards - "You 
need more than facts and knowledges" - Friday morning 
observations — Our big year to shine - - Winter Carnival 
is a weekend — "Disneyland In White" — It even snowed 
— The forgotten skill of snow sculpture is revived — Pi- 
noccio wins a trophy for the class of '64 — Queen Pageant 
chooses Cheryl Murphy -- Stunt Night Again -- Rehear- 
sal howls — "West Side Story" — We win — A great jazz 
concert - Basketball games — We're almost seniors — 
Tension of final exams — Well deserved summer — Need a 
job to buy that training school wardrobe - - Happy hunt- 
ing — September — We register as SENIORS - - The be- 
ginning of the end - - Class Officers: Wayne Goodnow. 
Marianne Duffy, Penny Agostini, Vergi Swiatek, and Bettc 
Laino — Hidden artistic abilities discovered — Our pen- 
manship and blackboard work improve — First Aid: Pre- 
med for teachers — ■ "This bandage begins with a simple 
cravat" - LESSON PLANS - - No more newsprint — 
First class to train off campus Warnings in Histoiy of 
Ed - T and M headaches — Missed lunches — Student 
Association is led by: Mario Jardin, Pres. Joe Campedelli, 
V. Pres. Karen Jorgcnsen, Sec. Bob McMenemy, Treas. — 
Lost prime spot in Stunt Night attempt — The debating 
club comes to campus — $25,000 equipment s^ift from 
General Electric Co. - - Picnic at Miss Toole's - - Days 
growing short — ■ final exams — Senior Prom at the Bubble 
Room -- GRADUATION "... and we will not forget 



fli 




■ 




. and we will 
not forget . . . 





Eight-Year $6.16 M illion Program 
for College Expansion Outlined 

Campus to Crow to 30 Acres, 



Enrollment Near 1.200 Seen 



By EDWIN MATESKY 

Dr. John Gillespie, director of state colleges in Massa- 
chusetts, last night outlined an eight-year, $6.16 million 
expansion program for North Adams State College to 
some 50 persons gathered for a meeting of the Chamber 
of Commerce of Greater North Adams. 

The estimated $6.16 million cost is broken into $5.38 
million for construction, $280,000 for planning and $500,- 
000 for land purchase costs 



<*- 



if the building would substan- 
tially increase enrollment, he 
said. 
"Thus the federal government, has been indefatigable in promot 



Dr. Gillespie said he hoped 
the boiler plant could go up this 
year, the women's dormitory 
next year and a building every 
year thereafter until the master 
plan, which he also called the 
"first phase," is comolete. 
Boiler Plant First 

Early in the discussion Dr. 
Gillespie said "everything de- 
pends on the boiler plant — the 
focal point of importance. Thanks 
to Rep. (Roger A.) Sala, who 



As explained by Dr. Gillespie, 
with the aid of maps, by 1971 
the college campus would be 
increased from its present five 
acres to 30 acres and the stu^ 
dent enrollment from the pres- 
ent 600 to between 950 and 1,200. 
Campus Boundaries 
If the plan is realized the cam- 
pus' new boundaries would be 
Blackinton Street on the north; 
and, approximately, the Bond 
Street line on the south; Ash- 
land Street on the west and 
Church Street on the east. 

And that's only the first phase. 
After that, Dr. Gillespie explain- 
ed as the population of high 
school graduates increases over 
the years so, too, will it be neces- 
sary to further expand the col- 
lege. 

It is likely the college would 
expand to the west, toward the 
Boston & Albany and Boston & 
Maine Railroad tracks which, he 
said, would have to be relocated. 

Someone in the audience asked 
if any thought had been given 
to relocating the college on land 
which wouldn't have to be con- 
demned. 
No, said Dr. Gillespie, if the 
college were to be relocated it 
would be relocated out of North 
Adams. There is too much of 
an investment already at the 
present site, he added, mention- 
ing the recently-built $1.5 mil- 
lion gymnasium and classroom 
building. 

"It's either here or nowhere," 
he said. 

He emphasized at the begin- 
ning of his 90-minute presenta- 
tion that the Master Plan "is 



not final and is subject to mod- 
ification as time goes on." 

Assisting Dr. Gillespie with 
explanation was Dr. Eugene L. 
Freel, president of the college. 
Proposed Construction 

To accommodate the increas- 
ed student enrollment, the fol- 
lowing facilities would be added: 

—A women's dormitory and 
dining hall for 200 students and 
transformation of the present 
Taconic Hall, a women's dormi- 
tory, into a dormitory for 104 
men. 

—A classroom building which 
would include administration of- 
fices. 

—Purchase of Mark Hopkins 
School and adjacent land from 
the city, modernize it, install 
observation TV and one-way 
glass and, according to Dr. Gil- 
lespie, "make it a truly ex- 
perimental school." 

—A separate library building. 

—A wing to the gymnasium 
so a swimming pool could be 
added. 

—A student union building. 

—A men's dormitory and a 
second women's dormitory. 
Source of Funds 

How do you pay for it? Dr. 
Gillespie asked, then answered 
his own question. 

The General Court, he said, 
must appropriate much of the 
money. 

Another factor includes the 
recently enacted federal High- 
er Education Facilities Bill 
which would provide one-third 
of the cost of an academic 
building if that building were 
to be used as a library, for 
science or foreign languages and 



oe very 
ts of the 
try's be- 



au sci \ncemen 
Board of Trade 
f the people of 



we hope, would pay for a third, 
of the library building," Dr.: 
Gillespie said. 

He added the nine-member 
State College Building Authority 
will also enter the picture be- 
cause it will build the second 
women's dormitory and the pro- 
posed men's dormitory. 



ing North Adams State College, 
the boiler plant will be under 
way shortly." 

Isadore Shapiro of 132 Corinth 
St.. who said his house would be 
very close to the boiler plant, 
asked if there will be "smoke 
and noise" from the plant. He 
hastily added he wasn't opposed 



The Authority has been em- to expansion of the college. 



uents contained in 
stmas card, which 



powered by the legislature to 
raise money on bond issues 
which would be paid off through 
the room rent payments of stu- 
dents. 

The General Court would 
make a direct appropriation to 
buy Mark Hopkins School, he 
added. 

And he said, "This is really 
not a pipe dream but is a very 
real possibility." 

Funds Available < 

Later it was explained funds 
are now available for the con- 
struction of a central power 
plant, at $1,015,000, and for the 
planning, at a cost of $75,000, 
of the first women's dormitory. 

Donald A. Thurston, president 
of the Chamber, asked, now that 
monev has been appropriated 
for these purposes, "when will 
something happen?" 

Three architectural firms — 
Anderson & Nichol, on the boil- 
er plant; Alderman & Jacoby, 
on the dormitory; and James 
Lawrence, on a study plan for 
the classroom building and li- 
brary — have already been ap- 
pointed. Dr. Freel said. 

And he added, pointing to the 
map. the timetable depends on 
the acquisition of 2' * acres of 
land. 

There are eight property own- 
ers in the area, Dr. Freel said, 
of which five have agreed to 
sell and three haven't. Condem- 
nation proceedings will probably 
take place or else the reluctant 
property owners will be by-pass- 
ed, he added. The state attorney 
general's office is suppose to be 
...",.v;™ «n the deed, he said 
s Loss Offset 



or mo; 
of itsel 
the citj 

Dr. I 
questioi 
a year 
by the 
more t 
propert 

-wa; 

struct 
ries ar 
dent un 
lor, N01 
tendent 

"Yes, 

—Will 
added t 
(Dr. T; 

We h 
yet, Dr 

— Wh; 
Mark E 

Dr. C 



Someone said Bennington Col- 
lege recently constructed a boil- 
er plant which "looks like a li- 
brary" and Dr. Freel added he 
understood the architects would 
be asked to beautify the boiler 
plant and to make it attractive, last ye 
Questions Raised with th 



are not 
sion at 
"nobodj 
with th< 
He si 



No one appeared to be op- 
posed to the plan but a number 
of questions were asked. Among 
them: 

—What impact will the ex- 
pansion have on the city's tax ] 
base if taxable properties are 
destroyed in the process? 
(George A. Lerrigo, hospital ad- 
ministrator) 

Dr. Freel said Geoffrey Ba- 
ker of Technical Planning As- 
sociates of New Haven, Conn., 
which is planning the city's 
south side urban renewal pro- 
gram, or Paul C. Wilson, execu- 
tive director of the North Ad- 
ams Redevelopment Authority, 
could answer. 

Mr. Baker said he declined 
to comment off hand. 

—Dr. Gillespie said initially, 
^ 

there would be a 
decrease in taxable revenue" 
and Dr. Freel added it is ob- 
vious an expansion will mean 
some loss. 

But at the outset Dr. Gilles- 
pie mentioned that a survey of 
purchasing power of NASC stu- 
dents was made which showed 
the college's then 400-student 
I enrollment was responsible for 
bringing about $385,000 a year 
into the community. 



By 1971, with between 950 

construction" program' | and 1 > 200 students, $1.5 million 

1 said, after Lerrigo's vould be beneficial to I would be brought into the city 

that the ei ^ milium and. he added a Sfi millinn 



tee pun 

"The 
and wil 
whenev 
request! 

-If 
kins Sc 
to the 
boundai 
hands c 
Preside] 

There 
it can 1 
combins 
contraci 
state ar 
Ur 

Mr. ' 
develop 
saw th< 
"large 
ban rei 
acre So 
~~*! If the 
"substantial t within 
land cc 
may b< 
ban rei 

Near 
Rep. S 
lem w; 
and M 
the mo 
mitory, 
would 
into be 

There 
about t 
Author 



ing in 
I 110sett.i1 



SENIOR ACTIVITIES 











90 



SENIOR BANQUET 









Q1 




92 










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96 




Consider that this 
day ne'er dawns again. 



Dante 





97 






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JOURNAL — 1964 



QQ 









// isn't really 
Anywhere/ 

It's somewhere else 
Instead! 



A. A. Mill 



100 















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If you know a better 'ole, go to it. 



Bairnsfathcr 







.. »»,,,,,,. 







\ 





103 




Why should there not 

be a patient confidence 

in the ultimate justice 

of the people? 



Abraham Lincoln 






104 




ft 






rW'> 




105 



&MJML 










L^ w>y worX; without disputing; it is the only 
way to render life tolerable. 



Voltaire 






n 




106 



/ like trees 
because they seem 
more resigned to the 
way they have to 
live than other 
things do. 



Willa Cathe 






The unmotivated herd that only sleep and feed. 



James Russell Lowell 



I 





109 




The frivolous work of 
polished idleness. 



Sir James Mackintosh 






;*'•- asanas 









•If: '^VVr^ 



110 







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112 



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A very merry, dancing, 
Drinking, laughing, 
Quaffing, and 
Unthinking time. 



John Drydcn 





^1 






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9mT UP 


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A pretty foot is a great gift of nature. 



Goethe 






116 



Real education 
must ultimatety 
be limited to 
men who insist 
on knowing; 
the rest is 
mere sheep- 
herding. 



Ezra Pound 











A I 





And thinking of the days which are no more. 



Wordsworth 



'' 










m ii 



*1 



^ ^1 • 





T 



*- 



I. 



li 








Go the primrose way to the ever- lasting bonfire. 



William Shakespeare 




121 






122 




Those smiles and glances let me see, 
That make the miser's treasure poor: 



Robert Burns 




193 






124 




Consider that this 
day ne'er dawns again. 



Dante 




125 



One always 
begins to forgive 
a place as soon as 
its left behind. 




Charles Dickens 




"***. 



%*»v* 



126 





■».- 



127 



DIREGO 




STAFF 



CO-EDITORS-IN-CHIEF Dorothy G. Ransford, Robert Geier 

BUSINESS MANAGER Virginia Swiatek 

ART EDITORS Marie Lingoski, Robert McMenemy 

CLASS PHOTOGRAPHER •. . Raynard Getty 

LITERARY CO-EDITORS Elizabeth Laino, Dolores Taylor, 

Karen Jorgensen, Mario Jardin 

CLASS AND FACULTY REPORTERS Caryl Morgan, Marianne Duffy, 

Bonita Jillson, Ruth Leab, Ann Flammia 

CLUBS AND ACTIVITIES Susan Agostini, Beatrice Steady, 

Marianne Proulx, Joseph Campedelli, Bette J. Goodnow 

SPORTS CO-EDITORS John Mozden, Wayne Goodnow 

CANDID ORGANIZATION John Mahoney, Neal Bombardier, 

Karen Madison, Donald Geisler, Lenore Richards, Stanley Fryc 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 



THE 1964 DIREGO STAFF WISHES TO THANK . . . 

Mrs. Ellen Schiff for her patience and guidance. 

Miss Margaret Mary Toole for her constant assistance. 

Mr. Douglas Plunkett of BERKSHIRE STUDIOS for our 

senior portraits and graduation photography. 

Mr. Matthew Lozinski for photography development. 

The many other people who contributed in any way to this publication. 



128 



$